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Can Diabetics Wear Contacts?
 

Do you have diabetes? Does this make you unsure of whether or not you can wear contact lenses? Well you're not alone. Diabetes is well known for causing many vision related problems, including fluctuating vision and blindness. With such serious complications occurring in a diabetic eye, why add contact lenses and their associated complications to the mix?



In fact, many diabetics can and have been successfully wearing contact lenses. Studies have shown that current soft contact lenses are acceptable for patients with diabetes. All that is required, however, is the understanding that people with diabetes can't wear their contacts as often as non-diabetics and that diabetics have to be a little bit smarter about taking care of their contact lenses. There are two main reasons for this:



1. The cornea (which is the transparent surface on the front of the eye) in diabetics has decreased sensitivity. What this means is that a diabetic patient will become aware of any problems with their contact lenses much later than a person with normal


corneal sensitivity.



2. Diabetics tend to recover and heal more slowly.



This combination of having a slower reaction time and a slower healing response can potentially lead to much more serious contact lens complications in a diabetic compared with a non-diabetic.



If you have either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes and wish to wear contact lenses, the first step is to visit your optometrist. Your eye doctor will be able to determine which contact lenses are most suitable for you. You will also be provided with an appropriate wearing schedule that will ensure that your eyes are remaining healthy while you are wearing the contact lenses. Don't give up on contact lenses before you even consider them!



About the author:

Elizabeth Smith is the writer and product researcher for http://www.bes t-discount-contact-lenses.com. She has had both theoretical and practical experience with hard and soft contact lenses. She is a contact lens wearer herself.

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